trade

trade n 1 Trade, craft, handicraft, art, profession are general terms which designate a pursuit followed as an occupation or means of livelihood and requiring technical knowledge and skill.
Trade is applied chiefly to pursuits involving skilled manual or mechanical labor and the management of machinery or tools
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the trade of a carpenter

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a blacksmith's trade

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he is a plumber by trade

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Craft is not always clearly distinguished from trade, but it tends to be used of those pursuits that involve not only manual or mechanical labor but allow more or less freedom for the exercise of taste, skill, and ingenuity; many of the crafts were once or are still carried on independently in the small shop or home; thus, weaving, tailoring, and goldsmithing are often spoken of as crafts; the village shoemaker practised a craft, but the laster in a modern shoe factory follows a trade.
Handicraft implies handwork and usually suggests dexterity in manipulation of instruments or of materials; in comparison with craft it tends to imply more definite independence from machinery and it more often applies to an activity carried on for other than purely economic reasons; thus, basket-making, embroidery, lacemaking, and bookbinding are handicrafts when carried out with the use of simple hand tools whether the products are primarily a source of livelihood or not.
Art as applied to an occupation (compare ART 1) implies the use of knowledge and skill by the practitioner and often comes very close to craft in such phrases as the manual arts, industrial arts, household arts, practical arts. But art, when unqualified, usually designates one of the creative pursuits (as painting or sculpture) that, whether practised as an occupation or an avocation, involve an elaborate technique, great skill, definite ends to be achieved, and the possession and exercise of highly personal creative judgment and taste. Further, art is so freely applicable to the general principles or underlying system of rules, methods, and procedures on which a trade or craft, or a creative pursuit, or a branch of learning or doing, or an aspect of human affairs is based, that it is often difficult, apart from the context, to determine whether the word denotes a pursuit or a technique
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the art of navigation

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the art of interior decorating

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dancing as an art, a profession, an amusement— Ellis

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proficient in the art of self-defense— Shaw

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literature is an art and therefore not to be pondered only, but practiced— Quiller-Couch

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Profession is, in general, applied only to a pursuit that requires prolonged study and training before one is ready to follow it as a means of livelihood; the term also often implies that one has undergone tests of one's fitness and has won a degree or has given proof of one's qualifications and has been licensed to practice; it often also implies devotion to an end other than that of personal profit or the earning of a livelihood
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law, medicine, architecture, and teaching are professions

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a person may be a clergyman, a nurse, a civil engineer, or a dentist by profession

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Analogous words: *work, employment, occupation, pursuit
2 commerce, *business, industry, traffic

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Trade — Trade, n. [Formerly, a path, OE. tred a footmark. See {Tread}, n. & v.] 1. A track; a trail; a way; a path; also, passage; travel; resort. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] A postern with a blind wicket there was, A common trade to pass through Priam s house …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • trade — 1 n 1 a: the business or work in which one engages regularly b: an occupation requiring manual or mechanical skill c: the persons engaged in an occupation 2: the business of buying and selling or bartering commodities 3: an act or instance of… …   Law dictionary

  • trade — [trād] n. [ME, a track, course of action < MLowG, a track < OS trada, a trace, trail, akin to ME trede, TREAD] 1. Obs. a) a track; path b) a course; regular procedure 2. a) a means of earning one s living; occupation, work, or line of… …   English World dictionary

  • trade-in — ˈtrade in noun [countable, uncountable] COMMERCE a way of buying a new car, computer etc in which you give the seller your old car etc as part of the payment; = part Bre: • A dealer may accept old equipment as a trade in on a new computer. • They …   Financial and business terms

  • trade — ► NOUN 1) the buying and selling of goods and services. 2) a commercial activity of a particular kind: the tourist trade. 3) a job requiring manual skills and special training. 4) (the trade) (treated as sing. or pl. ) the people engaged in a… …   English terms dictionary

  • trade-in — trade′ in n. 1) goods given in whole or, usu., part payment of a purchase: We used our old car as a trade in for the new one[/ex] 2) a business transaction involving a trade in 3) of or pertaining to the valuation of goods used in a trade in:… …   From formal English to slang

  • trade — (izg. trȇjd) m DEFINICIJA trg. trgovina, trgovanje SINTAGMA trade mark (izg. trade mȃrk) zaštitna ili trgovačka marka, žig, oznaka za robu jednog proizvođača; trade union (izg. trade jȕnion) radnički sindikat u Velikoj Britaniji, SAD u i drugim… …   Hrvatski jezični portal

  • trade-in — n AmE a used car, piece of equipment etc that you give to a seller of a new one that you are buying as part of the payment British Equivalent: part exchange ▪ Are you going to give your Ford as a trade in? trade in price/value ▪ The trade in… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Trade — Trade, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Traded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Trading}.] 1. To barter, or to buy and sell; to be engaged in the exchange, purchase, or sale of goods, wares, merchandise, or anything else; to traffic; to bargain; to carry on commerce as a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Trade — Trade, v. t. To sell or exchange in commerce; to barter. [1913 Webster] They traded the persons of men. Ezek. xxvii. 13. [1913 Webster] To dicker and to swop, to trade rifles and watches. Cooper. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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